General Arts & Science

This is a St. Lawrence College program delivered in partnership by Canadian College. Students receive two diplomas, one from St. Lawrence College and another from Canadian College. Once students receive their St. Lawrence College diploma, they are eligible to apply for their Post-Graduate Work Permit.

Program Benefits

The General Arts & Science Diploma provides a broad liberal arts curriculum that prepares students for the workforce, college programs, or transfer to university. Core courses provide a solid foundation in communications and interpersonal skills, computers, mathematics, analytical skills, science, and general education. Courses are chosen in consultation with the program coordinator, ensuring the right mix to meet each student’s interests and vocational goals.

Admission Requirements

Secondary School Diploma including Math 11 and English 12, or equivalent. Student must meet one of the language requirements.

  • Canadian College English Placement test, Pass with 60%
  • Smrt English 140, Pass
  • St. Lawrence College ESL Advanced, Pass with 60%
  • IELTS 6.0 (minimum of 5.5 in each section)
  • TOEFL CBT 213, TOEFL IBT 78
2 Years (4 Study Semesters)
St. Lawrence College Diploma
Fall (Sept-Dec)

Full-time Study

Student may work 20hrs per week

Winter (Jan-Apr)

Full-time Study

Student may work 20hrs per week

Summer (May-Aug)

Vacation

Students are able to work full-time  

Fall (Sept-Dec)

Full-time Study

Student may work 20hrs per week

Winter (Jan-Apr)

Full-time Study

Student may work 20hrs per week

Summer (May-Aug)

Vacation

Students are able to work full-time  

Note: Students can start at the beginning of either the fall or winter semester. Summer classes may be available on a limited basis

Study & Work

Work Opportunities

Students registered in all programs at Canadian College are permitted to work part time 20hrs per week during study semesters. During the Summer, vacation students are permitted to work full time.

Career Opportunities

The General Arts & Science Diploma provides a broad liberal arts curriculum that prepares students for the workforce, college programs, or university. Core courses provide a solid foundation in communications and interpersonal skills, computers, mathematics, analytical skills, science, and general education.

Curriculum

COMM 34 Introduction to College Communications

Introduction to College Communications provides instruction and practice in college and workplace communication skills, with an emphasis on the development of strategies to organize and express ideas in a clear and professional manner. Emails, memos, letters, short reports, and essays are used to develop effective writing skills suitable to a variety of audiences. Course work also provides opportunities for the development of students’ grammar, research, analytical, reading and listening skills. American Psychological Association (APA) format and documentation is introduced.

COMM 4 Business Technical Writing

This course will give you the foundation skills to produce documentation e.g. technical instructions, definitions, summaries, technical system descriptions, and manuals common in the workplace. Writing to inform readers to understand requires document design skills that differ from traditional writing skills. You are responsible for developing your vocabulary, basic grammar, spelling, graphic awareness and reading strategies to power your career.

SOCI13 Sociology of the family

The study of family sociology provides an important foundation from which to gain insight into family structure, its historical roots and cultural context. A focus will be will be on community and change taking place within family relationships today.

GENE 114 Professional Effectiveness

Entering a new environment presents challenges as we transition to a new set of values and expectations within a new organizational culture. This course is designed to examine the process of adjustment and to equip students with strategies for making successful transitions.

COMM 39 Communications for Business and Technology

In Communications for Business & Technology, the emphasis is on the development of professional business communication. Short reports, summaries, formal reports, resumes, and cover letters are used to develop technical and persuasive writing skills. American Psychological Association (APA) format and documentation is reinforced. Oral communication is developed through a variety of formal and informal speaking activities.

COMP222 Computer Application Fundamentals

This introductory computer course familiarizes students with the functionality of internal SLC student-driven systems including the student intranet site and email system. It also explores theory and concepts of computer hardware and software with a hands-on introduction to the Windows operating system, file management techniques, databases, and Internet browsers. Students use the current version of Microsoft Office to explore and apply various features of MS Word, MS PowerPoint, and MS Excel.

GENE 60 Topics in the Contemporary Workplace

This course is designed to help students adapt to the rapidly changing workplace. It provides an historical overview of our working society and how it has evolved. Issues such as employment equity, harassment, regulation of health and safety, unionization, professional organizations and codes of ethics are discussed. Students also identify strategies to meet the needs of current employers and to make interview processes work to their advantage.

COMM5001 Effective Communication and Professionalism

This course addresses the essential elements of effective professional communications and the expectations of employers. Emphasis is placed on practical business communication aptitudes including research, organization, logic, composition and speaking skills. Students also explore the impact of leadership when communicating with others. The effect of power, status, and leadership styles in the motivation and empowerment of employees is also addressed.

MATH 35 Introductory Business Math

This course begins with a review of basic algebraic concepts. The sequence of topics includes exponents, mensuration, linear equations in one and two unknowns and their application to problem-solving and concludes with simple and compound interest.

GENE36 Introduction to Nutrition

This course enhances your knowledge and appreciation of the importance of nutrition to health and wellbeing and the connection between excess and deficient nutrient intake and ill health. Topics include the Canada Food Guide, the basic nutrients, the processes of digestion/absorption, nutrition related diseases, weight management, and food labels and nutrition information reliability. Students analyze their personal dietary intake and activity level and subsequently plan meal patterns that are conducive to personal health and weight management.

GENE165 Issues in Cross Cultural Communication

This introductory online course highlights the complex and dynamic components of cultural groups and their interactions. Students reflect on their own cultures and learn about others through various theoretical perspectives including Social Science, Interpretive Approach, and Critical Approach. Based on concepts of history, power, and identity, students learn how intercultural communication is affected by language, non-verbal communication, culture shock, popular culture, relationships, and conflict. Students discuss how these theories can be used to examine differences between cultures.

COMP 30 PC Hardware & Software

This course serves as an introduction to the interaction between hardware and software. The major hardware components in a computer system are identified. The relationship among system software, application software and data is included in an explanation of how a computer system works. The skills necessary to properly use and care for a personal computer from outside the case will be covered.

PROJ1 Project Management

With the increasing pace of change in businesses today comes the increasing need for projects – and with more projects comes the need for more people to understand how projects work. This course is for all those wanting to understand the basics of project management according to a logic model (a plan). By developing their own projects, students will examine each step in the process including goal setting, project scope, charter, risk management and evaluation. Students will also experience first-hand the communication challenges that can make or break a project.

Electives

Students will choose an additional 11 elective classes from the selection of classes available at Canadian College.

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