Business Fundamentals (Diploma)

This program is designed for students interested in developing the skills and knowledge required for an entry-level position in the fields of business, accounting or marketing. Students will take a selection of courses aimed at providing the business basics— the foundation needed for future success in the business world.

Program Benefits

This program is intended to prepare a student for a career in the fields of business, accounting or marketing. At the end of this program students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the marketing techniques, human resource and financial management needed to maintain operations within a business organization.

Admission Requirements

  • High School Diploma, High School Completion Certificate, or equivalent.
  • Math 11 or equivalent
  • iBT 70, IELTS 5.5, CCEL 125 pass or 70% on the Canadian College online assessment.
36 Weeks (20 Hours / week)

Curriculum

CC 100 - Business Math

This is a fundamental course in business mathematics. Topics covered include mathematics of merchandising, simple interest, compound interest, annuities, loan amortization, and cost-volume-profit analysis. This course is designed to encourage students to develop mathematical skills and abilities by applying them to common business situations. Regardless of his or her prior math experiences, this course will enhance the learner's ability to use mathematics to solve problems and make sound decisions from both a career and personal perspective.

CC 101 - Accounting 1

This course introduces financial accounting concepts. Students learn the double-entry accounting system, including the preparation of financial statements, closing entries, internal controls for cash and payroll accounting.

CC 102 - Accounting 2

This course is a continuation of Accounting 1 and offers further insight into the field of accounting and how it serves the needs of the business community. We take an in-depth look at some specific items on the balance sheet, accounts receivable, inventory, capital assets, and current liabilities as well as the use of special journals, subsidiary ledgers, and end with an introduction to corporations. Applications of the principles learned will be applied to the preparation of financial statements, and in-depth problems, which emphasize the importance of accounting in decision making.

CC 105 - Business Enterprise

Students learn the challenges of starting a new business. Topics include strategic approaches to small business, small business startups, funding sources, market feasibility, buying a small business and franchising. Students begin to develop skills in financial management, market management, operations, human resource management and general small business management. Preparation of a business plan is a key experiential exercise.

CC 106 - Business Simulation

Entrepreneur is a dynamic business simulation covering entrepreneurship, ownership, retailing and the ethical and moral dimensions of management choices. Unlike most classroom exercises, a simulation provides an opportunity for the continuous practice of managing a business organization.

CC 120 - Economics

This introductory course emphasizes macroeconomics. Topics include economic principles such as opportunity cost; the law of diminishing returns; market price setting; price elasticity; and government price controls. Students also learn about unemployment, inflation, gross domestic product, money, banking and stabilization policies.

CC 130 - Operations Management 1

This course introduces the learner to the operations management profession. An operations manager is concerned with the planning, decision-making and actions required to produce and deliver the organization’s goods and/or services, as opposed to marketing its products, managing its human resources or accounting for its finances. Operations managers work in virtually all enterprises – manufacturing, service, government, for-profit and not-for-profit. Operations managers work in many parts of the organization, including Purchasing and Supply Chain, Inventory Management, Quality Management, Scheduling, Transportation and Logistics, and Front-line Supervision to name a few.

CC 131 - Operations Management 2

This second-level course continues the student’s introduction to the operations management profession and the wide variety of career paths that operations managers can pursue. Participants will continue to develop their awareness of the varied and complex roles that operations managers play in all enterprises – manufacturing, service, government, for-profit and not-for-profit. This course focuses on the analysis and decision-making that operations managers engage in as they strive for efficient, competitive production and delivery of the enterprise’s goods or services. Areas of study include process strategy, capacity planning, design of efficient facilities, and the various levels of planning needed to ensure that an organization can produce and deliver goods and services according to customer demands.

CC 139 - 21st Century Communication

Advances in technology are reshaping interpersonal communications, as well as how we mass communicate, advertise, organize and strategize in business. The knowledge that students are increasingly expected to demonstrate is transforming. 21st century skills include: information and communication technology (ICT) literacy, the ability to think and problem-solve, interpersonal and self-directional skills, global awareness, and financial, economic, business, and civic literacy. On demand video lessons will be available each week for students to view along with weekly small assignments and three major assignments through the course.

CC 140 - Communications

This introductory communications course emphasizes the development of reading, writing, listening and speaking business communication skills at a college level. Students write for various purposes and audiences and deliver short presentations to small groups. Students research, analyze, summarize and document information. Students self and peer evaluate written documents and oral presentations. Through reading, media response and discussion exercises, students improve their communication skills. Communicating in diverse teams and across cultures is emphasized.

CC 141 - Marketing 1

Designed to provide the student with an overview of the marketing concept and how it can be applied to any type of organization or service. Students also learn how key marketing concepts, principles, and theories can help marketers make effective decisions. Specifically the knowledge and understanding which are needed to assess product, price, promotion and distribution options, and to make marketing mix recommendations for specific target markets.

CC 142 - Marketing 2

This course focuses on the marketing mix, a collection of variables that marketers control and manipulate in changing market conditions. Once marketing objectives have been developed, companies must decide on specific pricing, products/services, distribution and marketing communication strategies. Students study each of these four marketing mix variables in depth and in the context of a marketing plan.

CC 150 - Business Computers 1

This course is the first part of an introduction to the computer skills required in business today. It provides the student with an introduction to computer file management and Microsoft Word.

CC 151 - Business Computers 2

This course will introduce and further develop Microsoft Excel skills that the student will need use in subsequent semesters and in the business world. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to prepare tables and graphs, use input fields, understand and be able to use Microsoft Excel insert functions and specialized functions. These functions include goal seeking, solver and data analysis.

CC 230 - Human Resource Management 1

This course deals mainly with the factors that affect the overall workplace atmosphere. Topics include the strategic importance of human resource management, demographic challenges, job analysis and design, human resources planning, recruitment and selection, training and orientation, government and legal challenges, and problem-solving techniques.

CC 231 - Human Resource Management 2

This advanced course gives students an appreciation of the technical aspects of human resources. Topics include performance appraisal, compensation management, financial incentives, employee benefits and services, employee relations practices, the union/management framework, and health and safety. Students who successfully complete this course and HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I (HRM 1200) with an average B standing receive a full credit toward the Human Resources Administration course from the Human Resources Professionals Association of Ontario.

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